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  • 1

    From Kaupapa Māori Research to Re-Searching Kaupapa Māori: Making Our Contribution to Māori Survival

    Summary

    Mikaere reflects on Kaupapa Māori research, and relates her experience of it as a researcher. She discusses the emergence of Kaupapa Māori research, and its effect on Māori researchers and others within the academy. She also explores the notion of ‘research’ in detail, and explains the resistance to it at Te Wānanga o Raukawa (where she now works)...

    Mikaere reflects on Kaupapa Māori research, and relates her experience of it as a researcher. She discusses the emergence of Kaupapa Māori research, and its effect on Māori researchers and others within the academy. She also explores the notion of ‘research’ in detail, and explains the resistance to it at Te Wānanga o Raukawa (where she now works).

    She emphasises the importance of maintaining a ‘critical edge’. ‘If and when a kaupapa Māori approach to research eventually becomes more widely acknowledged by the “mainstream” research community, there is the danger that what was initiated as a starting point could come to be regarded as a final destination,’ she says. ‘What started out as a radical and inspiring departure from the constraints of former research practice could so easily be reduced to a checklist of criteria on [a funding] application form…’

    Mikaere asks why it is important for Māori to continue to engage in mātauranga Māori – and replies that the answer concerns the survival of Māori as Māori. She criticises the idea that research should necessarily build on research that has already been done, noting that there are serious problems with much of the research that has been done on Māori. Then, she discusses the distortion of Māori theories of existence by the importation of Western notions of hierarchy, using examples.

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    Kaupapa Māori Education: Research as the Exposed Edge

    Summary

    Penetito says that research is one of the many ways in which Māori can challenge ‘the Pākehā world that takes itself for granted’. He says that it is important that we challenge all of the taken-for-granted worlds in which we live, regardless of which worlds they are...

    Penetito says that research is one of the many ways in which Māori can challenge ‘the Pākehā world that takes itself for granted’. He says that it is important that we challenge all of the taken-for-granted worlds in which we live, regardless of which worlds they are.

    He argues that it is wrong to research Māori as if Māori were a homogenous entity. There are, he says, numerous ways of being Māori – and he details some of them. He suggests that the dominant whakapapa definition of being Māori is a result of preoccupation with questions of identity.

    Penetito states that Māori research is critical for Māori advancement, because research can explain the way things are, and because it gives us confidence in current and future developments. He then discusses Kaupapa Māori research, which, he says, is participatory and action-oriented, involves a commitment to social justice, and is part of an international movement among indigenous peoples.

    He discusses theory, and the resistance to it that he has observed in his Māori students. He tells his students to ‘get over it’: ‘You need to learn these things. You need to be able to put it alongside what you have learned in other contexts like your home, your marae, your hapū, and your iwi. But don’t say you don’t need it…’

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  • 5

    Kaupapa Māori Theory: Transforming Theory in Aotearoa

    Summary

    Pihama addresses the development of Kaupapa Māori as a foundation for theory and research, emphasising the importance of tino rangatiratanga and mana motuhake. She then explores Kaupapa Māori theory, which she describes as ‘a theoretical framework that has grown from both mātauranga Māori and from within Māori movements for change’. She positions Kaupapa Māori theory within discussions of theory in indigenous movements worldwide, and then characterises it as ‘an evolving and organic theoretical development’...

    Pihama addresses the development of Kaupapa Māori as a foundation for theory and research, emphasising the importance of tino rangatiratanga and mana motuhake. She then explores Kaupapa Māori theory, which she describes as ‘a theoretical framework that has grown from both mātauranga Māori and from within Māori movements for change’. She positions Kaupapa Māori theory within discussions of theory in indigenous movements worldwide, and then characterises it as ‘an evolving and organic theoretical development’.

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  • 6

    Developing Services in Te Rohe o Ngai Tahu for Māori with Gambling Related Problems

    Summary

    Robertson et al. discuss the capacity and willingness of problem gambling services to engage with the development of effective strategies for Māori living in te rohe o Ngāi Tahu. The authors use a Kaupapa Māori approach, conducting interviews with (Māori and non-Māori) problem gambling service providers, as well as Māori health providers. They then present a framework to guide the development of problem gambling services in te rohe o Ngāi Tahu, and suggest that many of the issues identified will be relevant to other areas...

    Robertson et al. discuss the capacity and willingness of problem gambling services to engage with the development of effective strategies for Māori living in te rohe o Ngāi Tahu. The authors use a Kaupapa Māori approach, conducting interviews with (Māori and non-Māori) problem gambling service providers, as well as Māori health providers. They then present a framework to guide the development of problem gambling services in te rohe o Ngāi Tahu, and suggest that many of the issues identified will be relevant to other areas.

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  • 7

    Politics and knowledge: Kaupapa Māori and mātauranga Māori

    Summary

    Royal addresses the distinction between Kaupapa Māori and mātauranga Māori. He suggests that, unlike Kaupapa Māori, mātauranga Māori is not explicitly interested in the ethnic category ‘Māori’; he also argues that it does not provide a strategy. He says that Kaupapa Māori and mātauranga Māori are not unrelated, and have a lot to gain from each other...

    Royal addresses the distinction between Kaupapa Māori and mātauranga Māori. He suggests that, unlike Kaupapa Māori, mātauranga Māori is not explicitly interested in the ethnic category ‘Māori’; he also argues that it does not provide a strategy. He says that Kaupapa Māori and mātauranga Māori are not unrelated, and have a lot to gain from each other.

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    Becoming a Kaupapa Māori Researcher

    Summary

    Smith discusses her journey as a Kaupapa Māori researcher. As well as offering an explanation for why Māori are suspicious of research, she argues that research that strengthens Māori is invaluable, and suggests ways in which it can be beneficial. She also explains how she helped to establish the first independent Kaupapa Māori research organisation, Te Atawhai o te Ao (Independent Māori Institute for Environment and Health), and outlines its kaupapa...

    Smith discusses her journey as a Kaupapa Māori researcher. As well as offering an explanation for why Māori are suspicious of research, she argues that research that strengthens Māori is invaluable, and suggests ways in which it can be beneficial. She also explains how she helped to establish the first independent Kaupapa Māori research organisation, Te Atawhai o te Ao (Independent Māori Institute for Environment and Health), and outlines its kaupapa.

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  • 11

    Pretty difficult: Implementing kaupapa Māori theory in English-medium primary schools

    Summary

    Bishop recounts the difficulties encountered in attempting to implement Te Kotahitanga, ‘a large-scale kaupapa Māori school reform project that seeks to address educational disparities by improving the educational achievement of Māori students in mainstream schooling.’ He highlights three impediments, and suggests useful ways of conceptualising challenges...

    Bishop recounts the difficulties encountered in attempting to implement Te Kotahitanga, ‘a large-scale kaupapa Māori school reform project that seeks to address educational disparities by improving the educational achievement of Māori students in mainstream schooling.’ He highlights three impediments, and suggests useful ways of conceptualising challenges.

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  • 12

    Research Issues Related to Māori Education

    Summary

    Smith discusses the implications of the Sexton Report (a report on education, commissioned by the Business Roundtable) for research on Māori, and explores how education policy developers might conduct research that is appropriate for Māori. He contextualises his analysis by stating his ‘influences’, which include a ‘Kaupapa Māori base’, a politics of change, a rejection of pessimism, and a commitment to the importance of struggle...

    Smith discusses the implications of the Sexton Report (a report on education, commissioned by the Business Roundtable) for research on Māori, and explores how education policy developers might conduct research that is appropriate for Māori. He contextualises his analysis by stating his ‘influences’, which include a ‘Kaupapa Māori base’, a politics of change, a rejection of pessimism, and a commitment to the importance of struggle.

    He describes Kaupapa Māori as ‘a ‘local’ theoretical positioning related to being Māori’, which takes ‘for granted’ the validity and legitimacy of Māori, views the survival and revival of Māori language and culture as imperative, and is concerned with the struggle for autonomy over Māori cultural well-being and lives.

    Smith raises a number of concerns, held by Māori, about research generally; he also relates some of the factors that have prevented change to educational research on Māori in the past. He then outlines four ‘models’ for ‘culturally appropriate research’:

    1. the tiaki model, in which authoritative Māori people guide and mediate research

    2. the whāngai model, in which researchers are adopted by a community or whānau

    3. the power sharing model, in which researchers seek the assistance of a community to meaningfully support the development of research

    4. the empowering outcomes model, in which research has positive benefits for Māori first and foremost, and is designed to provide information that Māori want to know

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    Neither Qualitative nor Quantitative: Kaupapa Māori, Methodology and the Humanities

    Summary

    Somerville explores the relationship between Kaupapa Māori and the humanities, from within her discipline, English (or, as she would like to call it, Literary Studies). She problematises this relationship, challenging both Kaupapa Māori and English. With a poem by Evelyn Patuawa-Nathan, she ultimately affirms the importance of the humanities...

    Somerville explores the relationship between Kaupapa Māori and the humanities, from within her discipline, English (or, as she would like to call it, Literary Studies). She problematises this relationship, challenging both Kaupapa Māori and English. With a poem by Evelyn Patuawa-Nathan, she ultimately affirms the importance of the humanities.

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  • 16

    Achievements, orthodoxies and science in Kaupapa Māori schooling

    Summary

    Stewart states that discussions around Kura Kaupapa Māori are ideological rather than educational, and that this results in difficulties that hinder student achievement...

    Stewart states that discussions around Kura Kaupapa Māori are ideological rather than educational, and that this results in difficulties that hinder student achievement.

    She addresses the disjuncture between Kaupapa Māori theory and practice, saying, ‘Lack of awareness of the complex philosophical debates underpinning Kaupapa Māori can encourage [Kura Kaupapa Māori] practitioners to adopt a rule-following approach, which leads to orthodoxy. Orthodoxy acts to suppress opposing ideas, and greatly increases the tendency for unhelpful policies to continue unchallenged.’

    Stewart engages critically with arguments put forward by Elizabeth Rata, ‘the prominent published critic of [Kura Kaupapa Māori]’.

    She also explores utopianism in Kaupapa Māori theory and practice.

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    The Multiple Selves and Realities of a Māori Researcher

    Summary

    Webber explores identity, reflecting on the factors impacting her role as a young Māori researcher, which she describes as ‘complex, challenging and often fraught’. She discusses Kaupapa Māori theory and its development, asking whether or not Kaupapa Māori is being used in a prescriptive manner to say what ‘real’ Māori research practices are. She suggests that there are always constraints in any system; we need to be developing internal critiques and strengthening ideas, she says, so that Māori research processes do not remain static...

    Webber explores identity, reflecting on the factors impacting her role as a young Māori researcher, which she describes as ‘complex, challenging and often fraught’. She discusses Kaupapa Māori theory and its development, asking whether or not Kaupapa Māori is being used in a prescriptive manner to say what ‘real’ Māori research practices are. She suggests that there are always constraints in any system; we need to be developing internal critiques and strengthening ideas, she says, so that Māori research processes do not remain static.

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  • 20

    Kaupapa Māori research: Epistemic wilderness as freedom?

    Summary

    Cooper argues that, in education, Māori are regarded as producers of culture rather than knowledge. He says that Māori knowledge has been relegated to an ‘epistemic wilderness’, and that this can be understood positively as well as negatively. He says that Kaupapa Māori must engage with Māori epistemologies as well as engaging critically with scientific knowledge – which is something that location within the ‘wilderness’ can facilitate...

    Cooper argues that, in education, Māori are regarded as producers of culture rather than knowledge. He says that Māori knowledge has been relegated to an ‘epistemic wilderness’, and that this can be understood positively as well as negatively. He says that Kaupapa Māori must engage with Māori epistemologies as well as engaging critically with scientific knowledge – which is something that location within the ‘wilderness’ can facilitate.

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  • 21

    Claiming Interstitial Space for Multicultural, Transdisciplinary Research Through Community-up Values

    Summary

    Cram and Phillips suggest that the concept of ‘interstitial space’ can provide a framework for meaningful exchange. They discuss Kaupapa Māori, and explore the benefits to indigenous peoples of transdisciplinary research. They then develop the notion of interstitial space, saying that connections between disciplines and collaborative interpretations require this space. Within such spaces, meetings can focus on the research purpose, researchers’ philosophical approaches to a topic and debate about how their disciplinary backgrounds complement and challenge one another. Serious time and energy can be devoted to philosophical and methodological interrogation and integration. Disagreements and debate… can expose researchers to deep ideological tensions and push boundaries.’..

    Cram and Phillips suggest that the concept of ‘interstitial space’ can provide a framework for meaningful exchange. They discuss Kaupapa Māori, and explore the benefits to indigenous peoples of transdisciplinary research. They then develop the notion of interstitial space, saying that connections between disciplines and collaborative interpretations require this space. Within such spaces, meetings can focus on the research purpose, researchers’ philosophical approaches to a topic and debate about how their disciplinary backgrounds complement and challenge one another. Serious time and energy can be devoted to philosophical and methodological interrogation and integration. Disagreements and debate… can expose researchers to deep ideological tensions and push boundaries.’

    The authors then present a list of research values, derived from Linda Smith, that can guide individual researchers in transdisciplinary research:

    1. Aroha ki te tangata (Respect people.)

    2. He kanohi kitea (Meet people face to face.)

    3. Titiro, whakarongo… kōrero (Look, listen, and then speak.)

    4. Manaaki ki te tangata (Share, host, be generous.)

    5. Kia tupato (Be cautious.)

    6. Kaua e takahia te mana o te tangata (Do not trample the dignity of a person.)

    7. Kia mahaki (Be humble)

    They also adapt Mâsse et al.’s list of transdisciplinary items to provide a corresponding ‘transdisciplinary research readiness scale’ to encourage researchers to reflect on their readiness to engage in such research

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  • 22

    Decolonising the Academy: The Process of Re-Presenting Indigenous Health in Tertiary Teaching and Learning

    Summary

    Curtis et al. discuss the relationship between tertiary education providers and indigenous health, and explain the policies and practices that have been developed within the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland to improve Māori health...

    Curtis et al. discuss the relationship between tertiary education providers and indigenous health, and explain the policies and practices that have been developed within the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland to improve Māori health.

    The authors discuss Māori science, and explore the ways in which Māori engagement with science has been misrepresented. They present the implications of this ‘colonisation of Māori science’ for Māori health workers and the Māori population. They say that tertiary education providers engaged in training health professionals ‘must face the challenge of rejecting notions of Indigenous scientific inferiority, re-engaging Māori in science and creating a culturally safe and culturally competent non-Indigenous health workforce…’

    The authors highlight factors within tertiary education that contribute to health inequalities, and present a detailed account of the strategies undertaken within the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences to strengthen the Māori health workforce and develop Māori health expertise among all learners. They discuss the Vision 20:20 initiatives, which involve recruitment, bridging, and support for Māori and Pacific students, and Te Ara, a statement of commitment to the adoption of faculty-wide graduate outcomes in Māori health.

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  • 23

    Mapping the themes of Māori talk about health

    Summary

    Cram et al. explore how Māori talk about health. Their research was conducted ‘using Kaupapa Māori methods’. ‘Kaupapa Māori is ‘by Māori, for Māori’,’ they say, ‘and is inherently about cultural survival and tino rangatiratanga…’ They present the results of interviews with Māori recruited from urban, marae-based health services, outlining twelve ‘themes’ that provide an overview of: how Māori health is understood, which concepts are important, how Māori experience mainstream healthcare, and how Māori health is promoted: ..

    Cram et al. explore how Māori talk about health. Their research was conducted ‘using Kaupapa Māori methods’. ‘Kaupapa Māori is ‘by Māori, for Māori’,’ they say, ‘and is inherently about cultural survival and tino rangatiratanga…’ They present the results of interviews with Māori recruited from urban, marae-based health services, outlining twelve ‘themes’ that provide an overview of: how Māori health is understood, which concepts are important, how Māori experience mainstream healthcare, and how Māori health is promoted:

    1. Māori health

    2. explanations for Māori ill-health

    3. traditional ways

    4. rongoā

    5. integration

    6. wairua

    7. whānau

    8. interacting with the health system

    9. rapport

    10. whakamā

    11. promoting Māori health

    12. marae-based healthcare delivery

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  • 24

    Nā te Mātauranga Māori ka Ora Tonu te Ao Māori: Through Māori Knowledge Te Ao Māori will Resonate

    Summary

    Edwards discusses the relationship between mātauranga Māori and knowledge – both Māori and Pākehā. He explores the history of the term ‘mātauranga Māori’, and concludes that it is relatively new. ‘It is,’ he says, ‘what I call a third space, beyond the first space where it’s all about the dominant group, or the second space that attempts to bring us into the circle, but a third space where it’s all about us as Māori, about us knowing us.’..

    Edwards discusses the relationship between mātauranga Māori and knowledge – both Māori and Pākehā. He explores the history of the term ‘mātauranga Māori’, and concludes that it is relatively new. ‘It is,’ he says, ‘what I call a third space, beyond the first space where it’s all about the dominant group, or the second space that attempts to bring us into the circle, but a third space where it’s all about us as Māori, about us knowing us.’

    He addresses the distinction between mātauranga Māori and Kaupapa Māori. Mātauranga Māori, he says, ‘enjoys its space, privilege and opportunity’ largely because of Kaupapa Māori theory and practice. Without privileging either, he suggests that mātauranga Māori paradigms are powerful where a Māori worldview is central, while Kaupapa Māori is especially helpful in contexts where a Māori worldview is peripheral.

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  • 25

    Addressing indigenous health workforce inequities: A literature review exploring 'best' practice for recruitment into tertiary health programmes

    Summary

    Curtis et al. adopt a Kaupapa Māori methodological approach to identify ‘best practice’ for recruiting indigenous secondary school students into tertiary health programmes. They suggest that recruitment ‘should be framed from a comprehensive and integrated pipeline perspective that has the ability to include secondary, tertiary, community and workforce stakeholders’. They also identify six principles that might achieve success for indigenous health workforce development:..

    Curtis et al. adopt a Kaupapa Māori methodological approach to identify ‘best practice’ for recruiting indigenous secondary school students into tertiary health programmes. They suggest that recruitment ‘should be framed from a comprehensive and integrated pipeline perspective that has the ability to include secondary, tertiary, community and workforce stakeholders’. They also identify six principles that might achieve success for indigenous health workforce development:

    1. Framing initiatives within indigenous worldviews

    2. Demonstrating a tangible institutional commitment to equity

    3. Framing interventions to address barriers to indigenous health workforce development

    4. Incorporating a comprehensive pipeline model

    5. Increasing family and community engagement

    6. Incorporating quality data tracking and evaluation

    Reference

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  • 26

    Kaupapa Maori: Explaining the Ordinary

    Summary

    Barnes introduces the Whāriki Research Group, part of the Alcohol and Public Health Research Unit at the University of Auckland, and explains its research programme. She also discusses Kaupapa Māori research, which ‘tak[es] for granted’ a Māori worldview. (‘It is ironic,’ she says, ‘that the concept of maori, arising from its meaning of ordinary, is now seen as the other.’) She addresses the difficulties in defining Kaupapa Māori research – as well as the objection that there is ‘no such thing’...

    Barnes introduces the Whāriki Research Group, part of the Alcohol and Public Health Research Unit at the University of Auckland, and explains its research programme. She also discusses Kaupapa Māori research, which ‘tak[es] for granted’ a Māori worldview. (‘It is ironic,’ she says, ‘that the concept of maori, arising from its meaning of ordinary, is now seen as the other.’) She addresses the difficulties in defining Kaupapa Māori research – as well as the objection that there is ‘no such thing’.

    Reference

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  • 27

    Ranga Framework - He Raranga Kaupapa

    Summary

    Doherty distinguishes between mātauranga-ā-iwi, mātauranga Māori, and Kaupapa Māori theory. He presents his Ranga framework, by which he explains the relationships between the three ‘equal’ concepts. Kaupapa Māori theory, he says, protects the relationships between mātauranga-ā-iwi and mātauranga Māori: ‘Kaupapa Māori theory [ensures] the applications of the principles and values in mātauranga Māori are not homogenously applied to iwi.’..

    Doherty distinguishes between mātauranga-ā-iwi, mātauranga Māori, and Kaupapa Māori theory. He presents his Ranga framework, by which he explains the relationships between the three ‘equal’ concepts. Kaupapa Māori theory, he says, protects the relationships between mātauranga-ā-iwi and mātauranga Māori: ‘Kaupapa Māori theory [ensures] the applications of the principles and values in mātauranga Māori are not homogenously applied to iwi.’

    Reference

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  • 28

    Collaborative research with Māori on sensitive issues: The application of tikanga and kaupapa in research on Māori sudden infant death syndrome

    Summary

    Edwards et al. discuss researching sudden infant death syndrome – a highly sensitive issue – with Māori. They use a Kaupapa Māori research approach, and explain their experiences with reference to tikanga Māori. Their article incorporates extracts from their field notes...

    Edwards et al. discuss researching sudden infant death syndrome – a highly sensitive issue – with Māori. They use a Kaupapa Māori research approach, and explain their experiences with reference to tikanga Māori. Their article incorporates extracts from their field notes.

    Reference

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  • 29

    Conversations on Mātauranga Māori

    Summary

    Ngā Kaitūhono, the New Zealand Qualification Authority’s Māori Advisory Group, present a collection of essays on mātauranga Māori. Two of these essays – one by Wiremu Doherty, the other by Shane Edwards – explore the relationship between it and Kaupapa Māori theory. They also discuss the development of mātauranga Māori evaluative processes...

    Ngā Kaitūhono, the New Zealand Qualification Authority’s Māori Advisory Group, present a collection of essays on mātauranga Māori. Two of these essays – one by Wiremu Doherty, the other by Shane Edwards – explore the relationship between it and Kaupapa Māori theory. They also discuss the development of mātauranga Māori evaluative processes.

    Reference

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  • 30

    Māori knowledge: A key ingredient in nutrition and physical exercise health promotion programmes for Māori

    Summary

    Henwood discusses the experiences of Korikori a Iwi, a community development action research programme ‘based on’ a Kaupapa Māori framework. The programme used Māori culture to encourage good nutrition and regular exercise in five Māori communities...

    Henwood discusses the experiences of Korikori a Iwi, a community development action research programme ‘based on’ a Kaupapa Māori framework. The programme used Māori culture to encourage good nutrition and regular exercise in five Māori communities.

    Reference

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  • 31

    He Kohikohinga Rangahau: A Bibliography of Māori and Psychology Research

    Summary

    This bibliography presents a list of resources relevant to Māori and psychology, and includes a section headed ‘Kaupapa Māori Research’...

    This bibliography presents a list of resources relevant to Māori and psychology, and includes a section headed ‘Kaupapa Māori Research’.

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    Making sense of kaupapa Māori: A linguistic point of view

    Summary

    Keegan discusses the use of te reo Māori in Kaupapa Māori theory, giving special attention to the meaning of the term ‘kaupapa’. As well as analysing some of the key terms, he explores the changing nature of te reo Māori, and the use of te reo Māori in academic literature...

    Keegan discusses the use of te reo Māori in Kaupapa Māori theory, giving special attention to the meaning of the term ‘kaupapa’. As well as analysing some of the key terms, he explores the changing nature of te reo Māori, and the use of te reo Māori in academic literature.

    Reference

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  • 36

    Kaupapa Maori Action Research to improve heart disease services in Aotearoa, New Zealand

    Summary

    Kerr et al. present their research project on heart disease services in Aotearoa New Zealand, which combined Kaupapa Māori with action research and focussed on improving them...

    Kerr et al. present their research project on heart disease services in Aotearoa New Zealand, which combined Kaupapa Māori with action research and focussed on improving them.

    The authors discuss the relationship between Kaupapa Māori and action research. ‘Kaupapa Maori Research,’ they say, ‘naturalises Maori epistemologies, methodologies and practices so that Maori are not articulated as the ‘other’’. Action research is an empowering approach, which focuses on participation and change, using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods to generate solutions to problems that impact on the well-being of people and communities. ‘Action Research aligns with the Kaupapa Māori Research requirement for research to be conducted in Maori ways, dealing with issues important to Maori and likely to be of benefit to us,’ they say. ‘This congruence allows incorporation of the Action Research processes into a Kaupapa Maori Research framework.’

    They discuss their methods and findings – giving voice to their participants through the use of quotations. ‘Through Kaupapa Māori Action Research processes,’ they say, ‘we aimed to present different perspectives in order to reach understandings that would create shared pathways for change.’

    The authors address the need for time to achieve and assess systemic change.

    They then present the benefits of their research, evaluating it using questions derived from action research (including, ‘Were there useful processes and outcomes?’ and ‘Were plural ways of knowing generated?’, among others). They also explain the ways in which their research has benefitted Māori. ‘Having lived under an imposed colonial system for 160 years,’ they say, ‘Maori have developed first-hand experience and a good knowledge of medical systems, including how we are perceived within them… Other research reveals that health professionals do not appear to have a reciprocal understanding of the Maori world. Our approach allowed Maori experiences to be articulated and developed as a resource to facilitate change.’

    Reference

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    Across the Colonial Divide: Conversations About Evaluation in Indigenous Contexts

    Summary

    Cavino discusses evaluation and indigenous peoples within colonial and decolonisation contexts. She contrasts mainstream evaluation processes with three Māori approaches (Te Kotahitanga, Whakawhanaungatanga, and He Taniko). She argues that evaluation approaches engaging indigenous peoples are always representative of a particular standpoint, because they necessarily involve issues of colonisation and decolonisation. She also says that mainstream evaluation fails to address the needs and aspirations of Māori, and suggests that the focus of evaluation should be on the capacity of Māori to meet Māori evaluation needs...

    Cavino discusses evaluation and indigenous peoples within colonial and decolonisation contexts. She contrasts mainstream evaluation processes with three Māori approaches (Te Kotahitanga, Whakawhanaungatanga, and He Taniko). She argues that evaluation approaches engaging indigenous peoples are always representative of a particular standpoint, because they necessarily involve issues of colonisation and decolonisation. She also says that mainstream evaluation fails to address the needs and aspirations of Māori, and suggests that the focus of evaluation should be on the capacity of Māori to meet Māori evaluation needs.

    Reference

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  • 40

    Doing Research in Aotearoa: a Pākehā exemplar of applying Te Ara Tika ethical framework

    Summary

    Came discusses her application of Te Ara Tika – an ethical framework for Māori research, produced by the Pūtaiora writing group – in her doctoral research on institutional racism in the health sector. She relates her experience as a Pākehā researcher working with Māori, and argues that Te Ara Tika, which requires engagement with te ao Māori and active reflection on Pākehā paradigms, can guide Tauiwi in the development of ethical research in Aotearoa...

    Came discusses her application of Te Ara Tika – an ethical framework for Māori research, produced by the Pūtaiora writing group – in her doctoral research on institutional racism in the health sector. She relates her experience as a Pākehā researcher working with Māori, and argues that Te Ara Tika, which requires engagement with te ao Māori and active reflection on Pākehā paradigms, can guide Tauiwi in the development of ethical research in Aotearoa.

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